13 January 2013

Palmer B. Holdridge Civil War Letter #6: Baltimore October 21, 1862

NOTE: Disclaimer and explanation of formatting included at the end of this post.

Baltimore October 21/62
Dear Kate,
     I received yours of the 17th yesterday.
I was glad to hear you had got my letter at last.
I was afraid it had miscarried. You must
have received all that I had written before that.
I should have written of times, but was waiting to
hear from you since I wrote you before we have
been under marching orders and were hourly
expecting orders to leave, but those orders have
been counter? so we shall probably not
leave at present. It was when the rebels ?
into Pennsylvania.
     I have not much news to-
day as there is but little going on except the daily
routine of guard duty and drill. You asked
me and in one of your letters to explain the guard
duty. We have to stand on guard 8 hours
of the 24. To hours on and four off.
This brings us on four hours in the night
which is not very ? in good weather, but
[page break]
spoils our sleep. The beauty of guard duty will
begin when cold weather sets in. One man
has to guard from ten to fifteen ? and
is supposed to keep walking from one end
of his beat to the other. If he is caught
sitting down and asleep on his post he
is confined in the guard house and put
on extry duty.
     The guard is required to salute
every old ? that comes along if he were strap?
on his shoulders. The saluting is done by bringing
the peace ?to a present arms. The camp regulations
are being made more strict every day. No soldier
can leave the ground now except with a pass
from his Captain, signed by the Col. of the
Regiment and then is required to use? his
belt cartridge box and side arms.
     Two men deserted last week. They were taken
up in Pennsylvania and brought back here
this morning. One of them tried to desert
before when we were at Norwich.
[page break]
They are now confined in the guardhouse.
They are to be tried by court marshall what their
punishment will be. I do not know though it
is not likely they will be shot. One of them I
should not take to be more than 15 years
old. There was a man shot at Fort McHenry
Saturday for deserting and joining the rebel
army. He deserted at the battle of Bells Bluffs?
and was taken in Pennsylvania during the recent
rebel said into that state. He was taken to
Fort McHenry a prisoner and was there recognized
by some man of his own regiment.
     There was one of our own men of our regiment
shot accidentally the other day with a pistol
The ball entered his side and passed through
his body. He is not expected to live.
     What was news we get lately seems
to be favorable. It is said a great battle is
impending between McClellan’s army and the
rebels beyond the Patomac.
[page break]
But I have written enough about war. I must
now think of something else. You spoke about
sending me paper occasionally. If you come
across one occasionally that has interesting
news, I would like to have you send it. You
can send it to Charley Coirel? with one or two
penny stamps and he will do it up and
send it. I had the Cazenovia Paper to read
while Leaks? Company was here, but they have
been sent away as I do not get it.
They are on guard duty at the city. You want
to know if I am suited? with your going home
this winter. Of course I have no objections under
the circumstances and since I have thought
? more about it I have come to the conclusion
that it will be the best thing you could
do if your folkes are willing and I have no
doubt they are. You have not wrote me
whether there is many apples this year or not
We can get all we want of them here at two
or three ? We don’t want many
[page break]
at that price William and I are talki9ng
about sending home by and by after some
butter and a few other traps? of our stay??
through the winter. A good a good many have sent
for things already, but are still want awhile
get? The transpositions would not be once? Two
etc. for personal You had better believe I would
feast for one week if I was at home but
we usually get enough here ? as it is.
     Williams is getting quite well and is
now able to be on duty.
     But I must close as I go on guard one
o’clock and it is now dinner time. Write
often and if you have no means write love
letters. I would write one now if I had time.
Why don’t our folkes write? Pa could probably
tell me some things about what is going on
that you would not know and perhaps sis-
No Mary Jane I mean could tell me some things
about somebody or some things that nobody
else could
[page break]
Does Freddie eat with the rest of the family
or does he board himself yet? Don’t forget to
give him a good hugging and kissing for me.
     Direct as heretofore.
     Yours ever,
     P.B. Holdridge

this loose letter comes next.
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Explanation of formatting:
Effort is made to keep much of the spelling, line breaks, and page breaks preserved as shown in the original letter book on file with the William L. Clements Library. Some names of third parties and other select data sets are considered, with footnotes added. A question mark (?) will often indicate a word or letter that was not clear. It may be used to replace the word or letter. Other times it may show on the end of a word, if the transcriber was unclear about that specific word, but chose to transcribe it.


DISCLAIMER FROM AUTHORIZED PHOTOCOPY:
    PHOTOCOPIED FROM ORIGINAL IN WILLIAM L. CLEMENTS
    LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, PERMISSION OF
    LIBRARY DIRECTOR REQUIRED FOR REPRODUCTION, USE, OR
    PUBLICATION. DEPOSIT OF THIS COPY IN OTHER
    INSTITUTIONS IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.
DISCLAIMER FOR TRANSCRIPT:
This copy originally authorized to be kept in “family genealogy holdings”
as per permission from Janet Bloom, Research Specialist
William L. Clements Library - 19 February 2009.
In August 2011 permission to publish "a typed transcript... to my publicly accessible ... family tree websites" and "Provide copies of my photocopy to any interested relatives" was granted.

PHOTOCOPY ACQUIRED, TRANSCRIBED, AND SHARED WITH PERMISSION.
COPYING OF TRANSCRIPT REQUIRES PERMISSION OF TYPIST,
MICHAEL W. MCCORMICK, AND MUST FALL WITHIN NON-COMMERCIAL
FAMILY HISTORY PURPOSES. OTHERWISE CONTACT THE ORIGINAL REPOSITORY.

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